Arizona State University & Si Se Puede Foundation

Desert WAVE Sets New Standard in Underwater Navigation Challenge with Precision KVH Sensors
The RoboSub competition's goal is for an AUV to demonstrate its autonomy by completing various underwater tasks such as navigation, manipulating the environment (picking up, dropping, and shooting objects), identifying figures, and maneuverability. Desert WAVE's competition strategy was to be selective with required tasks, and it used a donated KVH DSP-1750 FOG to provide its AUV, Phoenix, with accurate navigation at RoboSub 2019.

The RoboSub competition's goal is for an AUV to demonstrate its autonomy by completing various underwater tasks such as navigation, manipulating the environment (picking up, dropping, and shooting objects), identifying figures, and maneuverability. Desert WAVE's competition strategy was to be selective with required tasks, and it used a KVH DSP-1750 FOG to provide its AUV, Phoenix, with accurate navigation at RoboSub 2019.

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Jill Demetri

Carnegie Mellon University

Flyover Modeling of Planetary Pits
Carnegie Mellon University combines visual, inertial, and LIDAR sensors to map subsurface caverns on the moon, mars, and beyond. Most scientists believe that underground, relatively protected areas know as planetary pits are probably the best environments to contain life and are targets for possible future spacecraft. KVH’s 1750 IMU was used in this effort providing accurate positioning, linear acceleration and angular velocity data to the system. This paper from Carnegie Mellon University discusses recent research using visual, inertial, and LIDAR sensors to create a model of a collapsed planetary pits or skylight from an aerial landing vehicle.

Carnegie Mellon University combines visual, inertial, and LIDAR sensors to map subsurface caverns on the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Most scientists believe that underground, relatively protected areas known as planetary pits are probably the best environments to contain life and are targets for possible future spacecraft. KVH’s 1750 IMU was used in this effort providing accurate positioning, linear acceleration and angular velocity data to the system. This paper from Carnegie Mellon University discusses recent research using visual, inertial, and LIDAR sensors to create a model of a collapsed planetary pit or skylight from an aerial landing vehicle.

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John Hopkins University

Preliminary Results with a Low-cost Fiber Optic Gyrocompass System
KVH Industries, Inc., provided the high-performance fiber optic gyro-based inertial measurement unit, KVH’s 1775 IMU, used for this preliminary experimental evaluation of a true north gyrocompass system. The KVH 1775 IMU was chosen because it was a commercially available low-cost inertial system. These preliminary results for a static benchtop IMU configuration are promising and directly applicable to static instrument deployment. The researchers also stress that further development, testing, and evaluation are needed for the dynamic IMU configuration typically found on autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and remotely controlled underwater vehicles (ROVs).

KVH Industries, Inc., provided the high-performance fiber optic gyro-based inertial measurement unit, KVH’s 1775 IMU, used for this preliminary experimental evaluation of a true north gyrocompass system. The KVH 1775 IMU was chosen because it was a commercially available low-cost inertial system. These preliminary results for a static benchtop IMU configuration are promising and directly applicable to static instrument deployment. The researchers also stress that further development, testing, and evaluation are needed for the dynamic IMU configuration typically found on autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) and remotely controlled underwater vehicles (ROVs).

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Jill Demetri

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Hierarchical Navigation Architecture and Robotic Arm Controller for a Sample Return Rover
KVH Industries provided the high-performance fiber optic gyro-based inertial measurement unit used in navigation by the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Autonomous Exploration Rover (AERO) team. AERO was developed to participate in the NASA Sample Return Robotic Centennial Challenge. KVH’s 1750 IMU was chosen to provide key data to the robot’s navigation system including accelerations and angular velocities needed for accurate dead reckoning when no good LiDAR features were available. The challenge is to develop systems capable of successfully executing complex tasks to reduce human exposure to dangerous environments and situations and enhance human knowledge and understanding.

KVH Industries provided the high-performance fiber optic gyro-based inertial measurement unit used in navigation by the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) Autonomous Exploration Rover (AERO) team. AERO was developed to participate in the NASA Sample Return Robotic Centennial Challenge. KVH’s 1750 IMU was chosen to provide key data to the robot’s navigation system including accelerations and angular velocities needed for accurate dead reckoning when no good LiDAR features were available. The challenge was to develop systems capable of successfully executing complex tasks to reduce human exposure to dangerous environments and situations and enhance human knowledge and understanding.

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University of Pennsylvania

BLAST – Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Sub-millimeter Telescope (BLAST)
A suborbital observatory studies star formation and evolution. Led by an astronomer from the University of Pennsylvania, an international collaboration of scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada establishes a sub-orbital observatory. Its overarching goal is to address important galactic and cosmological questions regarding stars and galaxies' formation and evolution. KVH’s navigation-grade DSP-1760 FOG was chosen for precise pointing, and because of its resistance to shock and vibration. BLAST provided the first large-area surveys of the galaxy, combining unique spectral coverage, angular resolution, and sensitivity, and improving those initial measurements.

A suborbital observatory studies star formation and evolution. Led by an astronomer from the University of Pennsylvania, an international collaboration of scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada establishes a sub-orbital observatory. Its overarching goal is to address important galactic and cosmological questions regarding stars and galaxies' formation and evolution. KVH’s navigation-grade DSP-1760 FOG was chosen for precise pointing and because of its resistance to shock and vibration. BLAST provided the first large-area surveys of the galaxy, combining unique spectral coverage, angular resolution and sensitivity, and improving those initial measurements.

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